Q:

How badly does an eviction hurt your credit?

A:

Quick Answer

An eviction notice does not necessarily appear on a tenant's credit report. Landlords must obtain an eviction judgment from a local court for the report to take note. According to CreditKarma.com, this situation causes credit scores to drop and often has repercussions for a tenant's work life. Some employers perform credit checks before hiring new workers and public records appear on the credit report for seven years.

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Full Answer

SmartCredit.com explains that an eviction only makes itself present on the credit report if a civil judgment is issued. If the landlord instead chooses to look past the breaking of the lease and is only concerned with recuperating any monies owed, the entry on the report is simply a collection. Fox Business recommends paying down existing balances and paying all current bills on time to improve one's credit score. Unfortunately, as the publication explains, it is not possible to have the eviction notice removed before the seven year time period elapses. Working to keep one's credit score high in other ways should help negate the damage caused by a previous eviction. Furthermore, Fox Business advises would-be tenants to discuss any eviction with landlords in the future, rather than letting the discovery occur during the standard credit check procedure.

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