Q:

What are bank notes made from?

A:

U.S. bank notes are made from a special paper blend, consisting of 25 percent linen and 75 percent cotton, created solely for the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing. This differs from the typical paper a person encounters day to day, which is made from wood pulp.

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Full Answer

Crane Paper Company manufactures this paper blend, which gives U.S. currency its unique look and feel. On bills for denominations $5 and up, the watermark and security thread are already embedded in the paper when it arrives. The ink on the bills is specially made and blended by the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing and is continually monitored for quality.

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