Q:

What banks count coins?

A:

Most banks and credit unions will count change for free or for a small charge. These institutions often require the change to be rolled and the person with the change to be a member of the bank.

Many banks do not offer the same coin counting services that they did in the past. Banks do not offer or promote these services because it is more convenient for people to simply visit a coin counting machine to redeem their coins for cash, store credit or gift cards.

For people who do not want to pay the higher rates of coin counting machines, it may be worth going to the bank and having the coins counted. Another option for those who want to be certain about accuracy is to count and roll the change themselves.

Sources:

  1. msn.com

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