Q:

How do you calculate hours per patient day?

A:

Nursing hours per patient day is calculated by taking the total number of nursing staff providing care divided by the total number of patients in a given day. This number helps to reflect the actual amount of patients on a unit and determine staffing levels.

Know More

Full Answer

Maintaining adequate nurse staffing levels is important because of the potential patient safety implications of too-low staffing levels. According to studies by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, lower nurse staffing levels are linked to higher rates of adverse patient outcomes. Such adverse outcomes include urinary tract infections, pneumonia and increased length of stay. In addition, the studies found a correlation between low staffing levels and high nurse dissatisfaction.

Learn more in Health Insurance
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a medical revenue code?

    A:

    A medical revenue code is used to describe and assign a dollar value to medical services provided to a patient, according to Value Healthcare Services. Revenue codes are used in communications between healthcare providers and insurance companies.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a medical "full code"?

    A:

    According to the Huffington Post, "full code" is a hospital designation that means to intercede if a patient's heart stops beating or if the patient stops breathing. It is the opposite code of DNR/DNI, meaning "Do Not Resuscitate/Do Not Intubate."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a contractual adjustment?

    A:

    According to the St. Bernardine Medical Center, a contractual adjustment is part of the bill that a hospital has agreed not to charge a patient because of billing agreements with the patient's insurance company. It is the most common type of adjustment made by medical providers.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the donut hole effect of Medicare Part D?

    A:

    The so-called donut hole in Medicare Part D coverage is the relative gap in coverage that occurs after a Medicare patient reaches the initial spending limit for covered drugs and before the patient qualifies for catastrophic coverage. The initial limit for drug coverage is $2,960 as of 2015.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore