Q:

Can a convicted felon become a paralegal?

A:

Quick Answer

A convicted felon can become a paralegal. There is not a law that prevents a person from becoming a paralegal, but some states have laws that restrict convicted felons from taking the bar exam to become a lawyer.

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Full Answer

Being a convicted felon may restrict the number of employers that are willing to hire someone as a paralegal with their firm, but some may see it as an advantage because the applicant knows what life behind bars is like. The type of crime the felon committed may also play a role in whether or not a law firm is willing to hire him on as a paralegal.

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Related Questions

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    What is the average salary for a paralegal?

    A:

    The national average salary for paralegals was $51,170 per year as of May 2013, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. The federal executive level was the highest-paying sector, as paralegals averaged $66,800 per year in this employment sector.

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    Can a felon get financial aid?

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    Felons are eligible to receive financial aid once they are no longer incarcerated. Criminals serving time are not eligible for federal student loans or federal Pell grants.

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    Would a convicted felon be allowed entry into Mexico?

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    A convicted felon is not advised to travel to Mexico. The Mexican authorities will send the person back to wherever he or she came from if they were to find out.

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    What are some felon-friendly jobs?

    A:

    There are many job opportunities for workers with felony records. Common positions held by felons include truck driver, warehouse worker, customer service representative, welder, construction worker, laborer and salesperson. An ex-con's chances of landing a job depend greatly on the attitude of the employer. Some employers bar felons from hire, while others bar only felons convicted of certain offenses or within a certain time period prior to application for employment.

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