Q:

Where can a person cash a payroll check?

A:

The most common place to cash a payroll check is at a local bank. Banks generally cash payroll checks as long as either the payee holds an account at that bank or the payroll check is drawn on that bank.

If the payee does not have a bank account, there are numerous check cashing services that can cash payroll checks. These services generally charge a small percentage of the check's total amount as a fee. Alternatively, payroll checks can usually be used by the payee to open a new checking or savings account at a local banking institution, regardless of which bank the check is drawn on.

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