Q:

What are cash crops?

A:

A cash crop is a crop that is grown to sell and not to be used by the farmer. Tobacco and cotton are two examples of cash crops.

Cash crops are distinguished from subsistence crops, which a farmer uses for the sustenance of his or her family. Different regions are ideal for different types of cash crops. For example, farmers in temperate climates tend to grow grains, such as wheat and oats, and fruits, such as strawberries and apples, as cash crops while farmers in tropical climates opt for items like coffee and tea. In the era of globalization, cash crops are growing more and more common as an interlocking global economy allows farmers to focus on one plant instead of a diversity of plants.


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