Q:

What is a counter cheque?

A:

A counter check is a check with blank spaces for the account information. Banks give these out to customers who have not yet received pre-printed checks. They may also give them to customers who have no other means of withdrawing cash from their accounts.

Since counter checks rely on handwritten account information, many businesses don't accept these as a form of payment due to the potential for fraud. Some banks have the capability of printing a small number of starter checks with official account information. This allows new account holders to immediately gain the ability to access the funds in an account.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What is a counter check?

    A:

    A counter check is a blank check with only the bank information printed on it. Prior to 1967, when the Federal Reserve required banks to begin imprinting the routing number using special magnetic ink, banks often provided customers with counter checks, according to Wikipedia.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long is a check valid for?

    A:

    Checks generally do not have expiration dates, and banks may cash checks even if they were written more than six months in the past. However, banks have the option to honor or dishonor a check more than six months old.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long is an uncashed check valid?

    A:

    Uncashed checks written from banks in the United States are generally valid for 180 days, unless otherwise noted. However, some banks may choose to honor even older checks at their discretion.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a check endorsement?

    A:

    A check endorsement is a signature on the back of a check. Financial institutions require all parties listed on the check to sign the back to be able to cash or deposit the check. A check typically has a designated area for customers to sign, and it is usually marked with the statement "Do not write, stamp or sign below this line."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore