Q:

What is the difference between single, double and triple bonds?

A:

Quick Answer

Covalent bonds between atoms can be single, with two electrons shared; double, with four electrons shared; or triple bonds, with six electrons shared. The more electrons that are shared by two atoms, the stronger their bond is, with a triple bond, such as is found in nitrogen gas, requiring a great deal of energy to break. For single-element compounds like nitrogen gas, the type of bond tends to match the number, up to three, of electrons required to complete the neutral element's outer valence shell.

 Know More

Full Answer

While electron valence shells are complicated within the transition metals, in many common elements, the outer electron shells are relatively simple and follow a predictable pattern. Most notably, the shells of these elements are only fully stable with two, in the case of hydrogen and helium only, or eight electrons. In cases which are close to having complete outer shells, such as sodium, which can lose one electron and thus an entire unstable shell, or chlorine, which can take one extra electron to complete its shell. Other elements, however, do not tend to do this because each electron gained or lost decreases their overall stability as they become more and more charged. Atoms always seek stability, and for most elements this is more easily accomplished through forming covalent bonds than through losing or acquiring electrons.

Learn more about Investing

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are municipal bonds?

    A:

    Municipal bonds are an investment that is backed by the government via a state, city or county and are exempt from any kind of federal income tax, according to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Municipal bonds are often used to pay for highways, schools, sewer systems and sometimes hospitals or non-profit organizations.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you invest in bonds?

    A:

    One way to invest in U.S. Treasury bonds, notes, bills or saving bonds is to buy them directly from TreasuryDirect.gov. Create an account, log in and purchase bonds to redeem them when the securities mature, explains the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Does the government ensure bonds?

    A:

    The only types of bonds that are insured by the government are U.S. savings bonds. Other bond types, such as corporate bonds, are backed by the issuing entity and have no guarantee of value from the government.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you buy municipal bonds?

    A:

    Buy municipal bonds in the primary market from the investment brokers charged with underwriting and managing the offerings of states, cities, counties and other local entities authorized to issue the bonds. Investors can also purchase municipal bonds on the secondary market from another bond investor.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore