Q:

Who is the director of the IRS?

A:

The Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), as of June 2014, is John Koskinen. The commissioner presides over the IRS. There is no position or title of significance at the IRS of "director."

As Commissioner, Mr. Koskinen is responsible for a system that collects an approximate 2.4 trillion dollars annually. This collection funds most federal government operations and services.The agency employs some 90,000 employees and has a budget of an estimated 11 billion dollars.

Koskinen has a long executive history, including a tenure at Freddie Mac (the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation), which included a 2009 appointment as acting executive director.

Sources:

  1. irs.gov
  2. irs.gov

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