Q:

Are there any jobs for kids 13 and under?

A:

Quick Answer

Children age 13 and younger may work in jobs not covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act, such as acting and babysitting, according to the Department of Labor. In addition, children may work in some agricultural jobs.

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Full Answer

Some jobs children can consider include newspaper delivery and performing household chores, states the Department of Labor. Children age 12 and 13 may work in non-hazardous agricultural jobs if one parent works on the same farm or gives written consent. Small farms not subject to minimum wage laws may employ children under the age of 12. Children may not work while school is in session. In addition, although not required by federal law, some states, including California, require children to obtain a work permit, according to the Saddleback Valley Unified School District.

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