How many bales of hay are in an acre?
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Q:

How many bales of hay are in an acre?

A:

Quick Answer

According to Oregon State University Extension Service, an acre may yield between 65 to 165 small bales of hay per cutting, with up to three cuttings per year. The yield depends on location, fertilization, plant species, plant age, moisture content and how tightly the bales are packed.

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Full Answer

Horses, cattle, sheep, goats, rabbits and guinea pigs eat hay to supplement or take the place of natural grazing. As of 2014, Florida horses consume 700,000 tons or roughly 25 million small bales of hay each year, according to Ranch Cattle Research.

Hay fields often include alfalfa, clovers, ryegrass, orchard grass, fescue, brome, timothy and/or Bermuda grass. The most nutritious hay has full leaves and unripe seed heads.

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    How many square bales are in an acre?

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    The yield of square bales of hay per acre depends upon several factors. These include the type of hay planted, the climate in which it is planted, weather patterns that occurred during the growing season, at what stage of growth the hay was cut, and the fertility of the soil.

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