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What is pictured on the back of the dime?

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Quick Answer

The back of a dime features the image of a burning torch along with an olive branch and the branch from an oak tree on either side. According to the U.S. Mint, the torch signifies liberty, the olive branch signifies peace and the oak branch signifies independence and strength.

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What is pictured on the back of the dime?
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Full Answer

The reverse side of the coin also features three inscriptions: "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "ONE DIME," and "E PLURIBUS UNUM," which is Latin for "Out of many, one." The current coin, in circulation since January 1946, is known as the Roosevelt dime; it features a bust of Franklin Roosevelt on the front side. The coin was designed by John Sinnock, Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint.

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