Q:

What is a "quitclaim deed" in Florida?

A:

Quick Answer

A quitclaim deed is used to transfer property to a new owner without making promises or guarantees about the title, according to Florida Probate Solutions. The primary requirements for a quitclaim deed are found in Florida Statute 695.26, according to the Lee County Clerk of Court.

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Full Answer

As the Lee County Clerk of Court explains, the exact requirements for the information and formatting for a quitclaim deed varies by clerk's office, which is part of the county-level government. General information includes the names of the grantor and grantee, identifying information for the property, and witness and notary public signatures. Quitclaim deeds are frequently used to add family members to a deed, according to Florida Probate Solutions.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between a property deed and title?

    A:

    Title is a legal term that means ownership while a deed is a legal document that serves to transfer the title of a piece of property from one party to another. The terms are used most often in the field of real estate, but deeds are also used in other circumstances.

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  • Q:

    What is a special warranty deed?

    A:

    A special warranty deed is used to convey a real estate title to the buyer and grants a warranty against the seller's actions during the seller's ownership only. It has fewer protections for the buyer compared to a general warranty deed, which warranties against defects through all ownerships.

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  • Q:

    What is an executor's deed?

    A:

    An executor's deed is the deed used by an executor to transfer property to an heir out of the estate of a dead person who had written a will. The presence of the executor helps to prevent problems when future heirs inherit the property.

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  • Q:

    What is a deed?

    A:

    Reference.com states that a deed is a legally binding written document in which one person transfers property to another. There are certain formalities that must be performed in order for a deed to be valid, such as having a deed formally delivered and having it acknowledged by an authorized commissioner.

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