Q:

What does "taahuname" mean in terms of writing an official invitation letter?

A:

Taahuname, or Taahhütname, is a Turkish word that means contract, covenant or escrow. In regards to an official invitation letter, it means that a person hoping to visit the United States has been formally invited by a U.S. citizen to visit the country.

An official letter of invitation is a personal document. It does not need to sound official. The formatting for the letter is similar to any other type of personal communication. The sender and the recipient’s information, such as names and complete addresses, is included. The purpose of the visit is stated, as well as what locations are to be seen and how long the visitor plans to stay with the host, or if the visitor is scheduled to stay elsewhere. It states whether the host plans to cover the visitor's travel and personal expenses. Specifics are required in order to be accepted by authorities.

Learn More
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is an approval letter?

    A:

    An approval letter is any letter written to grant official approval of a request. Approval letters are typically written in response to requests for approval regarding employee days off, business expenses, building projects and financing.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a claim letter?

    A:

    A claim letter details damage suffered by a claimant and lays out the expectations of the company to resolve the situation. Claims can be made for damage to people or property.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does "approved in principle" mean?

    A:

    The term "approval in principle" is a real estate term used when a lender pre-approves a borrower assuming that the borrower meets certain requirements, according to the lender Tesco Bank. When borrowers are approved in principle, they must still submit information to the lender to receive a firm approval.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does being "vested" in a company mean?

    A:

    Vesting in a company provides an employee with non-forfeitable rights over employer contributions or employer-provided stock incentives made to the employee’s retirement account or pension plan. Vesting occurs when an employee or individual acquires ownership. Financial vehicles, such as retirement savings plans, pensions or profit-sharing plans, are examples of vesting rights.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore