Q:

What time does the IRS process direct deposit refunds?

A:

The Internal Revenue Service generally deposits refunds within 21 days of receiving an income tax return. Because the funds are deposited directly into the bank account specified on the return, it is important that the bank routing and account numbers are correct to avoid a delay.

To check the status of a refund, visit the "Where's My Refund" link from the IRS home page. This information is available 24 hours after filing an electronic return or four weeks after mailing a paper return and is updated daily. The exact refund amount, filing status and taxpayer Social Security number is needed to obtain the status of a refund.

Sources:

  1. irs.gov

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