Q:

What is unfair treatment by an employer?

A:

Unfair treatment by an employer is defined as any negative action or reprimand issued based on race, religion, sex, national origin, age, genetics or disability, according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Denial of a reasonable workplace accommodation due to disability or religion is also defined as unfair treatment.

Harassment by co-workers, managers or customers based on disability, age, race, religion, sex or origin is a form of unfair treatment in the workplace, as is retaliation because an employee complained about discrimination on the job, according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Unfair treatment by an employer can also include any interference with the employee's right to join, assist or organize a union or engage in collective bargaining, according to the Nolo Law Center. Discrimination directly related to an employee's membership in a labor organization or an employee who chooses to strike is also deemed an unfair labor practice.

Unfair treatment by an employer may also relate directly to compensation, according to the Workplace Fairness Organization. For example, by law, employers are required to adhere to minimum wage requirements and overtime pay for employees, and many are required to provide for medical leave, employee compensation for job-related injuries and unemployment insurance benefits. When an employer is not in compliance with these laws, employees can report the actions to state and local labor agencies.

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