Q:

What is a good SAT score?

A:

Based on the 2012 percentile ranks, which are the most recent available as of 2014, an average SAT score is 500 Math, 510 Reading and 490 Writing; anything above these scores would be better than average. Scores of 580 Math, 600 Reading and 570 Writing place in the top quartile.

Each section of the SAT is scored out of 800. Only about five percent of students score 700 and above in any given section. Less than one percent of test takers score perfectly or even near perfectly. Colleges usually set minimum standards for both individual section scores as well as a minimum standard for the combined score.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Is 1500 a good SAT score?

    A:

    According to the Princeton Review, an SAT score of 1500 falls around the national average as of 2014. The average SAT scores for students admitted to institutes of higher learning varies from university to university.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a good score on the SAT?

    A:

    The national average for the new SAT is 1500, so any score above that is, by definition, above average. Whether that is "good" or not depends on the caliber of school the student hopes to attend.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long are SAT scores valid?

    A:

    SAT test scores do not expire. After high school and at least 1 year has passed since a last SAT test attempt, answers from past tests are deleted and test scores are archived. Test scores remain available for retrieval and reporting to schools and educational organizations at any time according to tester instructions.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do I add up my SAT scores?

    A:

    In order to add one's SAT scores, a student adds his final math, critical reading and writing scores together. The total possible score for the SAT is 2400, but only a handful of students achieve the perfect score annually. The lowest possible score is 600.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore