Q:

What are some good sentence starters?

A:

Good sentence starters are specific to an intended purpose. Sentence starters appropriate for written introductions include "This essay discusses" and "The central theme is." Other beginnings for opening sentences include, "The issue focuses on," "Views on [the topic] range from" and "The key aspect discussed is." Sentence starters that work for conclusions are "To summarize," "In conclusion" and "It has been shown that," according to Eastern Institute of Technology.

Within a document, sentence starters sometimes help make comparisons, as in "Similarly," "In the same way," "Likewise" and "Complementary to this." Writers are able to lead into contrasting points with sentence starters like, "In comparison," "On the contrary," "This is in contrast to" and "On the other hand."

Sentence starters are used to list additional ideas within the body of text. Examples include, "Another essential point," "In the same way," "Equally important," "Then again," "To elaborate" and "More importantly."

Common ideas are often introduced with, "The majority," "Almost all," "More than," "Numerous," "Usually" and "Several." On the other hand, lead-ins for unusual concepts include, "Rarely," "A few," "Seldom" and "Not many."

If text requires examples, useful sentence starters are, "For example," "An illustration of," "To illustrate," "For instance" and "Specifically." Relationships are presented with, "The evidence suggests," "These factors contribute to," "It is apparent that" and "After examining."

Sources:

  1. eit.ac.nz

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