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What makes a good speech for a class representative?

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Quick Answer

The most effective speech connects with an audience through ethos, pathos and logos, explains a University of North Carolina website. While there is no set model for giving a speech as a class representative, the same tips and tricks which apply to great speeches with other purposes can be applied in this case.

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Full Answer

An effective speech must use the three emotional appeals: ethos, pathos and logos. Ethos is the way in which the speaker gains the trust of the audience. To do this in a representative role, discuss problems facing the student body. Give a personal experience about how you have dealt with the same issues facing your peers, and how you have been affected by these issues just as they have.

Once you have gained the trust of the audience, it is time to use logos. Logos is logical arguing. By presenting logic in the form of facts, statistics and other undeniable claims, you both add to your credibility and give your audience useful information which supports your argument. Do your research before speaking so you can offer credible, interesting facts which back up the goals you wish to achieve as representative.

Finally, end the speech with a bit of pathos. Pathos is an emotional appeal. It is a way of getting to your audience's collective heart. To do this, think of something which students desperately want. This can be more access to phones in school, better food at lunch or more opportunities for field trips. Use these desires to your advantage. Talk about how you plan to make these things come to fruition. Ending with this approach leaves a pleasant taste in your peers' mouths. Another useful idea is to hold true to the acronym KISS, or Keep It Simple Stupid. Use simple sentences, try not to overreach your vocabulary and keep the speech succinct and on topic. These simple strategies should help you reach your target audience and, hopefully, gain more support among your constituents.

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