Q:

What are jury duty exemption letters?

A:

Quick Answer

A jury duty exemption letter is a response to a jury summons that states a given reason why the potential juror is exempted from serving jury duty. Each state has specific exemptions pertaining to jury duty, and most of them require a letter requesting the exemption.

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Full Answer

Personal situations can result in exemption from jury duty if addressed via an exemption letter. Some states list specific exemptions on the jury summons mailer that can be marked and sent back. Normally, a response to the exemption letter is needed before a potential juror can be dismissed from appearing on the date summoned.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Can a letter be written to explain why jury duty cannot be served?

    A:

    It is possible to write a letter requesting to be excused from jury duty, according to the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. The letter should clearly state how being a juror would create undue hardship on the individual, and it should be submitted to the court clerk.

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  • Q:

    What happens if you don't show up for jury duty in California?

    A:

    According to California Courts, Judicial Branch of California, if a citizen fails to show up for jury duty, the juror can accrue fines up to $1,500. If service presents an "undue hardship," a juror can request a postponement or to be excused. Otherwise, citizens are not exempt from jury duty.

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  • Q:

    How do you get exempted from jury duty?

    A:

    Exemptions from jury duty are granted for a variety of reasons, including undue hardship, lack of English proficiency, or being a member of the armed forces, according to the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. All courts operate differently, and exemptions from jury duty are granted by the summoning court.

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  • Q:

    Will you get excused from jury duty if you are a sole caregiver?

    A:

    A prospective juror may be released from jury duty if she is a sole caregiver, but there is no guarantee since exemptions are given on a case-by-case basis. In Illinois, for example, jury duty exemptions are allowed in cases where a person is a sole caregiver of a child under 12, a disabled person or a person who has a medically diagnosed behavioral condition.

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