Q:

What is the past tense of the verb bite?

A:

Quick Answer

The past tense of the verb "bite" is “bit.” It does not follow the common “add an ‘-d’ to the end of the verb” pattern that verbs such as "walk" and "talk" follow because "bite" is an irregular verb.

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What is the past tense of the verb bite?
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Full Answer

In order to put the sentence “I bite the apple because it looks juicy” into the past tense, one would say “Five minutes ago, I bit the apple because it looked juicy.” The conjugation of the verb is identical regardless of what person the subject of the sentence is. The full conjugation of the past tense is: I bit, you bit, he bit, we bit, you all bit, they bit.


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