Q:

What is a child's primary caregiver?

A:

Quick Answer

A child's primary caregiver is the adult who assumes the most responsibility in caring for the health and well-being of the child. While one or both parents are the most common primary caregivers, this term is often associated with other adults who take on this role.

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Full Answer

Primary caregivers may include grandparents, other relatives or a legal guardian. Being a primary caregiver carries some legal implications, as a person taking on this role with a child may seek legal or practical rights to offer care and support. When a child is admitted to a medical facility, for instance, the primary caregiver may have to complete a declaration or application to acquire rights typically reserved for parents.

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