Q:

What are the different child care jobs?

A:

There are various positions available in the child care business, such a nanny, au pair and babysitter, day care worker, preschool teachers and mother's helpers, says the family-centered website Care.com. Some of these positions require minimum education, such as a high school diploma, while others require college education and certifications.

Nannies typically work in the home on a part-time or full-time basis. Nannies may be solely responsible for child care or may be given additional duties, such as household cleaning and running errands. There is no educational requirement for a nanny position, and salary is based on living arrangements, whether the nanny lives in or out of the home, as well as years of experience.

Au pairs, preschool and nursery teachers often have college degrees as well as other necessary credentials, such as the Child Development Associate (CDA) certification. Au pairs often live in the home and are regulated by the state, according to Care.com.

Babysitters usually do not live in the home and do not have any specific educational requirements. Responsible teens often take on jobs as babysitters, sitting for only a few children at a time, as do people looking for part-time income. They typically charge hourly rates and do not take on the additional duties that a nanny would do.

Day care workers must meet the requirements of the day care facility and state in which they work, especially if they work in licensed child care centers. They often teach specific skills, such as motor and social skills development, and care for several children at a time in a classroom setting.

Sources:

  1. care.com

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