Q:

What is Accent seasoning?

A:

Accent seasoning is commonly known as monosodium glutamate, or MSG, and adds flavor to a number of dishes, primarily in Asian cooking. The low-sodium seasoning provides additional flavor to meats, as well as fish and vegetables.

Many consumers in the United States do not use MSG in their cooking, due to allergies and reactions after ingesting the substance. In Asia, MSG is often used in restaurants, as well as meals that are prepared at home and by food processors. Aside from enhancing existing flavors, this product also contains less sodium than traditional table salt, making it an optimal choice for individuals who need to maintain a low-sodium diet.


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