Q:

When was Boone's Farm wine first produced?

A:

Quick Answer

Boone's Farm wine, produced by the E. & J. Gallo Winery, started as an apple wine that was first released for sale in 1961. Over the years, the company introduced numerous fruit-flavored wines and malt beverages under the Boone's Farm label.

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Full Answer

Some popular Boone's Farm flavors have included blackberry, green apple, mango, peach, pink grapefruit, sangria and watermelon. The line of Boone's Farm malt beverages has included flavors like fuzzy navel, orange hurricane, pina colada and strawberry daiquiri. Boone's Farm is regularly sold in convenience and grocery stores across the United States. Since some state liquor laws prohibit the sale of wine in these types of stores, Boone's Farm products are labeled as malt beverages instead of wine.

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