Q:

Is burnt popcorn bad for you?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the National Cancer Institute, consuming food that has been cooked beyond a temperature of 248 degrees fahrenheit, which includes burned popcorn, may carry a health risk due to the formation of possibly carcinogenic acrylamide. Inhaling the smoke from burned popcorn could also pose a health risk.

Know More

Full Answer

While studies on humans are incomplete as of 2014, the World Health Organization has listed acrylamide in food as a major concern and emphasizes the need for more research on dietary acrylamide risks. The EPA classifies smoke as fine particles, which carry a higher likelihood of aggravating asthma or causing other respiratory symptoms.

Learn more about Snacks

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a good birthday message for a business associate?

    A:

    The best birthday message for a business associate is one that addresses him personally and wishes him the best for the upcoming year, such as "All of us at our company wish you a happy birthday and another year of success." The message should be personal but remain professional.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    When did Flamin' Hot Cheetos come out?

    A:

    In 1976, a janitor who worked in the Frito-Lay plant pitched the idea of the Flamin' Hot Cheetos to the company. It was a hit with the Frito-Lay company.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some no-carb snacks?

    A:

    Meats are the only foods that are truly free of carbohydrates, meaning no-carb snacks must consist of turkey roll-ups, unbreaded cooked chicken, cubed beef and other similar items. Sushi minus starchy vegetables and rice is another no-carb snack option.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Does Keebler offer printable coupons?

    A:

    Keebler offers coupons through a general Kellogg's brand website (kelloggsfamilyrewards.com), but users must create an account to log in and clip or print them. By creating an account, users are entitled to various exclusive savings.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore