Q:

Does canned soup go bad?

A:

Quick Answer

It is possible for canned soup to go "bad" if it is not stored properly. Canned items are best stored in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight and should be used prior to the expiration date.

Know More
Does canned soup go bad?
Credit: Seba Sofariu CC-BY-2.0

Full Answer

There are several signs that indicate that canned food is spoiled. The exterior of the can may be dented or leaking, or the lid may be bulging. The food inside the can may appear moldy or discolored, or it may have an unusual odor. Liquid may spurt out when the can is opened. Food that is suspected to be spoiled should not be consumed and should be discarded immediately.

Learn more in Food Spoilage

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How long do canned sardines last?

    A:

    According to the Bumble Bee company, which manufactures canned sardines, if properly stored with no damage to the can, sardines in a tin stay good for several years. Sardines do have a "Best By" date that is typically stamped on the can by the manufacturer.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long can you keep home-canned tomatoes?

    A:

    Home-canned tomatoes that are canned following a tested recipe, with proper processing and storage techniques, can safely be stored for one year. After one year the tomatoes start to lose their quality. Natural chemical changes can occur resulting in a color, flavor and nutritional value change.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Does canned soup expire?

    A:

    Canned soup rarely carries a "use by" label or expiration date. Instead, many canned soups contain a "best by" label. This is an indication of quality rather than safety, as most canned goods can last several years beyond this time frame with no safety concerns.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Can I get sick from eating spoiled chicken?

    A:

    It is possible to become sick from eating spoiled chicken. Consuming spoiled chicken may cause symptoms of food poisoning, which include diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Pregnant women, young children, older adults and those with weakened immune systems have a higher chance of serious complications from food poisoning.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore