Q:

What are carbohydrates broken down into?

A:

Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars that are used by the body for energy. As carbohydrates are eaten, the digestive tract breaks them down into monosaccharide units, or glucose. The glucose enters the bloodstream and travels first to the brain, which runs entirely on energy from glucose.

After the glucose needs of the brain have been met, the remaining glucose travels to the other tissues of the body. Once all of the immediate glucose needs of the body have been met, the remaining glucose converts to glycogen, a polysaccharide storage form of glucose. Glycogen is mainly found in the liver and muscles of the human body. If there is more glycogen available than room to store it, the body converts the excess to fat. The fats are stored in the adipose tissue. Once glucose is changed into glycogen and then fat it cannot be changed back into glucose, but it can still be used for fuel. Parts of the body that can only run on glucose for energy, such as the brain, cannot use fats for fuel. Carbohydrates exist in almost every type of food that humans ingest. Simple carbohydrates are found in foods like white bread, pasta and fruit. Complex carbohydrates are found in items such as whole grains.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Are lentils carbohydrates?

    A:

    Lentils supply a significant amount of carbohydrates; a 1/2 cup serving of cooked lentils provides 20 grams, which the body uses for energy. Lentils are also high in dietary fiber, a complex carbohydrate. One serving has 8 grams; most of it is soluble fiber which helps lower cholesterol levels.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the monomers of carbohydrates?

    A:

    Carbohydrate monomers are called monosaccharides, which are also known as simple sugars. They are composed of either five or six carbons that have a ring-like structure and form a single sugar. Examples of monomers are glucose, fructose and galactose, which are all simple sugars. There are also disaccharides, which are two simple sugars bonded together, but they are not the main monomers of carbohydrates.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are carbohydrates made of?

    A:

    Carbohydrates consist of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Carbohydrates supply the body with a source of energy and are the building blocks of cellulose and glycogen. They also combine with other molecules to form DNA, RNA, glycolipids, glycoproteins and ATP.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the subunits of carbohydrates?

    A:

    Carbohydrates are separated into three subunits: monosaccharides, polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. Monosaccharides are the smallest of the subunits and are made up of single sugar molecules. The most common monosaccharides are the sugars fructose and glucose, and these typically take on a ring-shaped structure.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore