Q:

What is the difference between rubbed and ground sage?

A:

The biggest difference between ground and rubbed sage is the spice's texture. Rubbed sage is created by rubbing the sage leaf into a light mix, and ground sage is made by grinding the leaf into a fine powder.

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Full Answer

The flavor of rubbed sage is less intense and also not as concentrated as ground sage. Therefore, if a more potent flavor is desired, higher measurements of the spice should be used.

Sage is an herb and is often used in the seasoning of chicken and turkey. This spice is also used in many stuffing recipes.

Sage is a popular spice used in Italian and Greek recipes and is Mediterranean in its origin.

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    What is dry sage?

    A:

    Dry sage refers to the dried leaves of the sage plant, or Salvia officinalis as it is scientifically known. Dried rubbed sage refers to the whole or slightly crumbled leaves of the plant, while ground sage is finely ground dried sage leaves.

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    What does the herb sage look like?

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