Q:

Who makes Dime bars?

A:

Kraft Foods makes the Dime bar, a crunchy milk-chocolate candy bar. The candy was renamed in 2005 and called Daim bar to standardize the name in Europe. The candy was known as the Dime bar most commonly in the United Kingdom.

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Full Answer

The name change from "Dime" to "Daim" in the United Kingdom was done to create a unified brand and trademark for the candy bar in the global market. In the 1980s, the candy underwent a name change in Scandanavian countries when it was rebranded from "Dajm" to "Daim." According to Confectionery News, the candy bar is popular in Norway, Germany, Finland, France, Denmark, the United Kingdom and Sweden.

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