Q:

What is a foo yung dish?

A:

Quick Answer

Foo yung is a Cantonese omelette dish made from a fried egg cake mixed with vegetables, meat and seafood. Foo yung dishes are native to Shanghai, but variations of the recipe are popular in Chinese fusion cuisine throughout East Asia and the United States.

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Full Answer

The dish is made by frying a beaten egg mixture in hot oil so that the eggs become crispy and golden-brown. Some common vegetables added to the mixture before frying include bean sprouts, mushrooms, cabbage, water chestnuts and scallions. When the foo yung contains meat, it is most often pork, shrimp or chicken. The dish is typically served with a brown gravy.

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