Q:

What is framboise liqueur?

A:

Quick Answer

As “framboise” is the French word for “raspberry,” framboise liqueur is a raspberry liqueur. It is also referred to as "liqueur de framboise." Framboise liqueur is used in mixed drinks and cooking.

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Full Answer

CocktailDB lists nine cocktail recipes that call for framboise liqueur, including Rose in June, Land's End Cocktail and Queen Charlotte Cooler. According to The Cook's Thesaurus, framboise liqueur makes a tasty addition to champagne and goes well with ice cream.

Produced and sold in France, framboise liqueur is rarely exported and has limited availability. Cooks and bartenders can substitute Chambord or other raspberry liqueurs as substitutes when framboise liqueur is specified in a recipe.

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