Q:

What is German rock sugar?

A:

Quick Answer

German rock sugar is a form of unrefined sugar that is typically unprocessed, unbleached and resembles caramel-colored rocks in appearance. It is used primarily to sweeten tea, but it can be mixed into any food or beverage.

Know More

Full Answer

The origin of German rock sugar is in the region of East Frisia in the northwestern corner of Germany. The tradition is to place a piece of rock sugar, termed Kluntjes, in the bottom of a cup and then pour brewed hot tea over it, which melts the sugar and causes it to emit a crackling sound. One teaspoon of German rock sugar contains about 25 calories, making it higher in calories than granulated sugar at only 16 calories per teaspoon.

Learn more about Sweets

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How large are sugar granules?

    A:

    The size of sugar granules varies depending on the type. Granulated sugar is usually available in three types of grain: table sugar, superfine sugar or coarse-grained sugar.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long does a sugar rush last?

    A:

    The duration of a sugar rush varies greatly depending on a number of factors. Characteristics such as age, gender, activity level, genetics and muscle mass influence how quickly the body uses sugar.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is sugar made of?

    A:

    Sugars are short-chain carbohydrates made of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms. Table sugar, or sucrose, is composed of two simple sugars: fructose and glucose. Sources of sugar include sugar beets, sugar cane, honey, and hydrolyzed corn starch; the last is used to produce high-fructose corn syrup.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Is sugar bad for you?

    A:

    Sugar eaten in excess can cause an increase in the level of blood fats and can lead to obesity. Eating too much sugar can add excess calories to the diet, which contributes to weight gain, and decrease the number of other nutritious foods a person eats.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore