Q:

Are gourds poisonous?

A:

Gourds are not poisonous to humans, although some types do have a bitter taste that make them very difficult to eat. According to Wildflower.org, there are four types of gourds, including the buffalo, fingerleaf, coyote and Okeechobee gourd, all of which are native to North America.

The buffalo gourd has a bitter taste that makes it inedible. Another plant in North America with gourd-shaped fruits called the balsam gourd is considered toxic; however it works primarily as a laxative if you eat the berries. This is not listed as being seriously toxic, and it is known only as having minor toxicity.

Sources:

  1. wildflower.org

Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Are radish leaves poisonous?

    A:

    Radish leaves are not poisonous and can be consumed by humans. They can be washed, picked off the stems and added to other salad greens, such as spinach, romaine, arugula or kale, since the leaves are slightly peppery like radishes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many saltines can you eat in a minute?

    A:

    It is difficult for most humans to eat more than two saltine crackers in a minute without drinking. The crackers easily fit into a person's mouth, but they are so dry that they exhaust the supply of saliva, and a dry mouth makes it difficult to swallow the crumbs.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Are sprouting potatoes safe to eat?

    A:

    According to Good Housekeeping, it is safe to eat sprouting potatoes if the sprouts are cut away and not consumed. In addition, any green parts of the potato should be removed before the potato is eaten.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why is it important to eat carrots?

    A:

    Carrots are an important part of any diet because they are an excellent source of vitamin A, as explained by Diana Herrington of Care2. The beta-carotene in carrots is converted into vitamin A by the liver. Falcarinol, a natural pesticide produced by carrots, acts as an anti-cancer agent in humans.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore