Q:

How many teaspoons of whole allspice and ground allspice do I need?

A:

Six whole allspice berries are equivalent to 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of ground allspice. Allspice can be used as a substitute in recipes calling for ground cloves in most cases.

A substitution for allspice in recipes is 1/2 teaspoon of ground cinnamon plus 1/8 teaspoon of ground cloves for each teaspoon of allspice. Allspice berries can be heated in the oven or cooked for a short time on the stove to release more flavor, but take care not to overheat them to avoid a bitter taste. Allspice affects the potency of yeast, so use it sparingly when adding it to baked breads.


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