Q:

How many types of potatoes are there?

A:

According to The United States Potato Board, seven types of potatoes are commonly enjoyed by consumers: russet, long white, round white, fingerlings, red, yellow and blue or purple. The potato industry refers to them as table-stock varieties.

These popular potato varieties are sold in supermarkets and farmer's markets, and they are suitable for meals served in homes and restaurants. The russet is the most popular variety due to its nice size and hearty texture. This type has brown skin and white flesh and can be used in a wide variety of recipes that call for potatoes. Russets can be boiled, baked or roasted.

Learn More
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where did potatoes originate?

    A:

    Potatoes were first eaten and cultivated in the Andean highlands of South America, between Bolivia and Peru. Spread to Europe and North America by Spanish explorers, these tubers are ranked second among the world's most staple crops.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where do potatoes originally come from?

    A:

    Potatoes originally come from South America, particularly Bolivia and Peru. The native people grew potatoes in the high plateaus and the Andes Mountains because it was too cold to grow wheat or corn there. There is evidence of the potato being eaten as early as between 8000 and 5000 B.C.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How much does a bag of sugar weigh?

    A:

    White, granulated sugar packaged for consumers typically weighs 1, 2, 4, 5, 10 or 25 pounds. Other common sugars, such as confectioner's sugar and brown sugar, are usually sold in 2-pound bags.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where do potatoes fit in the food pyramid?

    A:

    Potatoes fit into the vegetable section on the food pyramid. More specifically, potatoes belong to the sub-category of starchy vegetables. Other members of the starchy vegetable group are corn, lima beans, water chestnuts and black-eyed peas.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore