Q:

How much is a fifth of liquor?

A:

A fifth of liquor is the colloquial term for a 750-milliliter bottle. Converting 750 milliliters to ounces yields 25.4 ounces, just under one-fifth of a 128 ounce gallon, hence the colloquialism. Other traditional bottle sizes, the pint and half-gallon, have also changed with the introduction of metric measures.

Pint bottles are now 375-milliliter bottles, almost 4 ounces less than a true pint. A half-gallon bottle, also known as a handle, is 1.75 liters, also 4 ounces shy of its original measure. Other common measures of liquor are a 1.5-ounce shot, a 50-milliliter mini-bottle, and a 33.8-ounce, or 1-liter, quart bottle.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a fifth of alcohol a fifth of?

    A:

    A fifth of liquor was equal to one-fifth of a gallon, which is a common unit of measurement for distilled spirits in the United States. Even though people colloquially refer to liquor bottles as "fifths," since 1980, they have actually been 750 milliliters or 25.36 ounces, which is slightly less than exactly one-fifth of a gallon.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many calories are in a 750-milliliter bottle of chardonnay?

    A:

    A 750-milliliter bottle of chardonnay contains approximately 600 calories. Multiple wine makers state that a 5-ounce serving of chardonnay contains 120 calories. Converting 750 milliliters to ounces yields about 25 ounces of wine; thus, each bottle has about five 5-ounce servings. Five servings times 120 calories equals 600 calories.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the Mercer infection?

    A:

    Mercer infection is a colloquial term for MRSA, which stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, according to Staph Infection Resources. This staph bacteria, which has become resistant to antibiotics, making it harder to treat, initially causes pimple- or boil-type lesions on the skin that can turn into painful abscesses.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is drinker's nose?

    A:

    Drinker's nose is a colloquial term for a red, bulbous, lumpy nose, which was once thought to be caused by alcohol abuse, according to WebMD. Instead, a red and swollen nose can be a caused by rhinophyma, an uncommon form of the skin disorder rosacea.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore