Q:

How much sugar is in Pepsi?

A:

Quick Answer

A 12-ounce serving of Pepsi contains 41 grams of sugar. The sugar and high fructose corn syrup found in Pepsi are responsible for the 150 calories delivered by each 12-ounce serving. A 20-ounce bottle of Pepsi contains 69 grams of sugar and 250 calories.

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Full Answer

The same 12-ounce serving of Diet Pepsi does not contain any calories or sugar, but it does deliver a full 35 grams of sodium. The American Heart Association recommends limiting the consumption of calories from sugar to no more than 100 per day for women and 150 per day for men to minimize the risk of weight gain leading to obesity and diseases such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

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    What are all the Pepsi products?

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    What is Pepsi made of?

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    The Pepsi soft drink is made from carbonated water, high fructose corn syrup, caramel color, sugar, phosphoric acid, caffeine, citric acid and natural flavor. The Pepsico brand also features a number of other beverages, including Gatorade and Amp energy drink.

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