Q:

What does oregano taste like?

A:

Oregano has a warm, slightly bitter taste with a hint of sweetness. It is often the main spice in pizza sauce. Oregano is also called wild marjoram or pot marjoram.

Dried oregano is often easier to find than the fresh version. The dried spice has a more intense flavor. Mediterranean oregano tends to have a milder flavor than Mexican oregano. Mediterranean oregano is commonly used for sauces, while Mexican oregano is in some chili recipes. In Greek, the word "oregano" means "delight of the mountains," and the herb has a number of health benefits. For instance, the thymol in oregano has antibacterial and anti-fungal properties.


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