Q:

What part of bok choy is edible?

A:

Quick Answer

All parts of the bok choy, also called Chinese white cabbage, are edible. There are many recipes that use both the crisp leaves and stalks. Its flavor is a cross between spinach and cabbage.

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What part of bok choy is edible?
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Full Answer

Bok choy is a popular vegetable used in Chinese cuisine. Before using in a dish, such as in a stir-fry or soup, it is important to wash and separate the leaves from the stem or stalk because these parts require different cooking times. The stem takes longer to cook.

Although it is fine to eat baby or young bok choy raw in a salad, it is generally better to cook it slightly first.

Bok choy is rich in nutrients, such as vitamins A and C.


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