Q:

What is the scientific name for vinegar?

A:

Quick Answer

Vinegar is known by the scientific name dilute acetic acid. Acetic acid typically composes between 4 and 18 percent of vinegar. Other names for acetic acid are ethanoic acid, hydrogen acetate and methanecarboxylic acid. It may be abbreviated as AcOH.

 Know More

Full Answer

The chemical formula for dilute acetic acid is CH3COOH. The acid is produced through a fermentation reaction between ethanol and acetic acid bacteria. Using fast production methods, this process can be completed in a period ranging from 20 hours to three days. Table vinegar has a concentration of acetic acid on the lower end of the range, while packaged products, such as pickles, have a higher concentration.

Learn more about Food Facts

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the active ingredient in vinegar?

    A:

    The active ingredient in vinegar is acetic acid. This acidic substance gives vinegar its pungent smell.Full Answer >

    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the shelf life of balsamic vinegar?

    A:

    Balsamic vinegar, once opened, can last indefinitely if stored in the correct conditions. Optimally, it should be stored at a constant temperature between 4 and 30 degrees Celsius, away from sunlight in a sealed container.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why don't oil and vinegar mix?

    A:

    Oil and vinegar do not mix because lipids are insoluble in water. Vinegar is mostly water, so it does not form a solution with vegetable oil. The primary reason that oils and water do not mix is that their individual molecules are strongly attracted to others of their kind. This means that oil molecules attract other oil molecules, water molecules attract other water molecules, and both exclude each other.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Does vinegar disinfect?

    A:

    Although vinegar is not as effective as commercial cleaners, it is a natural disinfectant that can kill bacteria and viruses. Vinegar's disinfecting properties come from the acetic acid that is part of its composition, but this acid also damages some types of surfaces, so it should be used with caution.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore