Q:

Where do sesame seeds come from?

A:

Sesame seeds come from the Sesamum Indicum plant, which is a native of Africa. The seeds are used to make sesame oil and spices, and are also used as a flavoring on bread.

The Sesamum Indicum plant grows up to 6 feet tall. This drought-resistant plant has oblong leaves and white-to-light-rose flowers. The seeds are formed in grooved capsule-like fruits and contain more than 100 seeds.

Sesame seeds are full of antioxidants and minerals such as copper, manganese, calcium and Vitamins B1 and E. The seeds have a nutty flavor that is enhanced by roasting them. Medicinally, the seeds are used to treat anemia and blurred vision.

Sources:

  1. tropilab.com

Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Where does mayonnaise come from?

    A:

    Mayonnaise itself comes from a mixture of oil, egg, vinegar, spices and other condiments. The name mayonnaise reportedly comes from the word "Mahonnaise." It was called mayonnaise after a misspelling in an 1841 cookbook.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where does asparagus come from?

    A:

    Asparagus is a perennial plant that originated in the eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor. The word "asparagus" comes from Greek and means "sprout" or "shoot."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long do poppy seeds remain in your system?

    A:

    Morphine and codeine from poppy seeds are sometimes detected in urine tests up to 48 hours after pastries containing poppy seeds are eaten, according to the United States Anti-Doping Agency. Eating poppy seeds usually does not cause a person to test positive on a drug test.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where did cake come from?

    A:

    According to Foodtimeling.org, cake dates back to ancient times and began with the Egyptians. Cakes were first made to be bread-like. By the 18th century when cake pans were developed, people considered cakes to be a symbol of well-being and they were sometimes used in religious ceremonies.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore