Q:

What is a substitute for orzo pasta?

A:

According to the Italian food company Barilla, orzo can be substituted with Arborio rice. The word orzo means barley in Italian, but orzo pasta does not contain barley; it is usually made with Durum wheat flour, also referred to as semolina.

Orzo is shaped like a grain of rice; it has a firm texture. The natural color of orzo is off-white. Often served in soups or chilled in salads, some orzo uses vegetable extract to change its natural color. Gluten-free orzo made with quinoa, lentil and other flours are also available. Other substitutes for orzo are fregola pasta and couscous, depending on the dish being prepared; these pastas and grains are interchangeable.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Which pasta is in Italian wedding soup?

    A:

    Italian wedding soup is made with orzo, a type of pasta that is in the shape of a large grain of rice. The word "orzo" is Italian for barley. This pasta is also sometimes called risoni, which in Italian means big rice.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where did pasta originate?

    A:

    The origin of pasta is debatable. Pasta is believed by some to have originated in China. It was said to have been brought to Italy by Marco Polo, a merchant from Venice. Others believed that Polo rediscovered pasta, and that the food was originally consumed by the Romans and Etruscans.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are pasta tubes called?

    A:

    Because there are different varieties of tubular pasta, they have different names, including penne, rigatoni, cannelloni, manicotti and macaroni. Tubular pasta can come in varying lengths and sizes. For example, perciatelli are long pasta tubes, while manicotti are wide.

      Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Is it safe to eat uncooked pasta?

    A:

    There is little bacterial danger present in uncooked pasta if it has been properly stored and handled. However, cooking pasta breaks down starches, making it easier to digest.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore