Q:

What are substitutes for summer savory?

A:

Some substitutes for summer savory are winter savory, thyme or thyme with a dash of sage or mint. Summer savory has a milder taste compared to winter savory and thyme herbs. The savory plant is characterized by its strong, peppery flavor.

Summer savory is a common ingredient for many different Mediterranean dishes, often being used to flavor various meats and beans. It is also commonly used with vegetables and mushrooms. Its counterpart, winter savory, has a stronger taste, and it works best when cooked slowly. This makes it an ideal ingredient for stews and other dishes that require slow cooking.

There are many other herbs besides winter savory that can be used to replace summer savory, however. Thyme, while stronger in taste, can replace summer savory, especially when added with a dash of sage or mint. Summer savory also comes in handy as a substitute for many other herbs, so the relationship can be reciprocated. Some of these herbs include basil, sweet basil and marjoram, also known as sweet marjoram or knotted marjoram. There other herbs related to summer savory as well, such as oregano, which is also referred to as wild marjoram or pot marjoram. Another substitute for summer savory can be equal parts parsley and celery leaves.

Sources:

  1. foodsubs.com

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