Q:

How do I become a South Carolina resident?

A:

For purposes of obtaining a South Carolina driver's license, one need only establish a permanent address within the state. To qualify for in-state college tuition rates, one must maintain an address in the state for at least one year or be employed within the state of South Carolina.

As of September 2014, the South Carolina state statute regarding in-state tuition also states that those living in state less than one year but who wish to claim residency must be full-time employees. Once relocating to the state, a new resident has 90 days before he must obtain a South Carolina driver's license.

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    A:

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