Q:

What is Denmark famous for?

A:

Denmark is famous for several things, including being home to the Round Tower. The Round Tower was built in the 17th century and is the oldest functional observatory in all of Europe.

Another popular attraction Denmark is famous for is the Little Mermaid statue. That statue is located in Copenhagen and, as of 2014, it is more than 100 years old. The statue was created by Carl Jacobsen and it is made completely of bronze. Through the years, the statue has been subjected to vandalism, including having paint poured on her and having an arm sawed off. Each time the statue has been restored to its original look.


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