Q:

How did Mount St. Helens get its name?

A:

Quick Answer

The modern name of this volcano was given to it by Captain George Vancouver in 1792. He named it in honor of Alleyne Fitzherbert, who was the British ambassador to Spain. Fitzherbert held the title of Baron St. Helens.

Know More
How did Mount St. Helens get its name?
Credit: Harald Sund Photographer's Choice Getty Images

Full Answer

Before Captain Vancouver named the volcano, Native Americans living in the Pacific Northwest referred to it as "Louwala-Clough," which meant "smoking mountain."

Mount St. Helens was considered an inactive volcano until it erupted in 1980, reminding the world that it was as dangerous as volcanoes found in Hawaii and Alaska. After that famous explosion, researchers began studying the volcano and discovered it had erupted on several different occasions, some as early as 40,000 years before.

Sources:

  1. mt-st-helens.com

Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    How big is Mount St. Helens?

    A:

    Mount St. Helens, an active stratovolcano, has an elevation of 8,363 feet. It is located in Skamania County, Wash., in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where is Mount St. Helens located?

    A:

    Mount St. Helens is located in Washington state at 46.2? N, 122.2? W. It is an active volcano that has been a tourist spot for years.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What effect did Mount St. Helens have?

    A:

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens at 8:32 on May 18, 1980 was a major geological event that continues to have many effects on the 150 square miles surrounding the volcano. This eruption is classified as the worst volcanic disaster in United States history. In this explosion, the mountain lost its conical tip and 1,300 feet in elevation. Fifty-seven people and hundreds of animals lost their lives.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    When is Mount St. Helens going to erupt again?

    A:

    While it is not yet possible to predict volcanic eruptions decades in advance, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Cascades Volcano Observatory continually monitors Mount St. Helens to gather data for more accurate short-term predictive models. According to “Future Eruptions at Mount St. Helens,” this volcano is the most likely to erupt in the Cascade Mountains of Washington again in the coming decades.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore