How did Wisconsin get its name?
Credit:B GarrettCC-BY 2.0
Q:

How did Wisconsin get its name?

A:

Quick Answer

The exact origin of the name Wisconsin is uncertain, but it likely comes from one of two Native American words. Wisconsin may be an Algonquian Indian word that means "long river," or a Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe word, "Ouisconsin," that means "grassy place," or "gathering of the waters."

 Know More

Full Answer

Staying true to the notion of a grassy place, Wisconsin has more than 14,262,000 acres of farmland, according to American Farmland Trust. Wisconsin's nickname is "The Badger State." It carries this name not because it has an abundance of badgers but because many early settlers were miners who burrowed into the hills for shelter as badgers do rather than building homes above the ground.

Learn more about The Midwest

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where is Wisconsin?

    A:

    The state of Wisconsin is located in the north-central part of the United States. It shares borders with Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois as well as Lake Michigan and Lake Superior.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the capital of Wisconsin?

    A:

    Wisconsin's capital city is Madison, a city of 233,000 people as of 2014. Located in the south of the state, Madison is more than just the state capital; the city also serves as the seat of the surrounding Dane County.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What state is Milwaukee in?

    A:

    The city of Milwaukee rests in southeastern Wisconsin, about 90 miles north of Chicago. The state is bordered by Minnesota to the west, Iowa to the southwest, Illinois to the south, Indiana to the southeast, Lake Michigan to the east and Michigan to the northeast.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where is Milwaukee located?

    A:

    Milwaukee is a city in Wisconsin, located in the north-central region of the United States. The city is situated along the western shore of Lake Michigan.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore