Q:

What is the lowest point in Africa?

A:

Quick Answer

The lowest point in Africa is Lake Assal, which is 512 feet below sea level. This saline lake located in Djibouti is the third-lowest land depression in the world, following the Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee.

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Full Answer

Lake Assal is 12 miles long and 4 miles wide. It has an average depth of 24 feet and a maximum depth of over 130 feet.

Because no water flows out of Lake Assal and there is a high evaporation level, it has a salinity level that is 10 times higher than that of the ocean. It is the second-most saline body of water in the world, following Don Juan Pond.

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